Boyd: Bardo Songs (Part 1) & Group Show

October 23 - November 10, 2021

Opening Reception: Saturday, October, 23, 2021: 2-5pm

As the conditions with Covid have stayed in a steady state, Nancy Boyd & Wallace Galleries have agreed to split the show and include some other works in the show by various of our gallery artists. Thus, a select group show will be simultaneously exhibited with a selection of Nancy Boyd’s exhibition. So we aim to surprise you with a stunning selection of various artist to compliment the Boyd exhibition. We hope you will join us for the opening!

Nancy Boyd: Bardo: From Tibetan Buddhism: a state of existence between death and rebirth, varying in length according to a person’s conduct in life and manner of, or age at, death.

Metaphorically, “Bardo” can describe times when our usual way of life becomes suspended, as, for example, during a period of illness.

Galleries West Magazine’s Mark Mushet interviewed Nancy Boyd for her exhibition. HERE is the link to the video that is available now.

Opening Reception: Saturday, October, 23, 2021: 2-5pm

As the conditions with Covid have stayed in a steady state, Nancy Boyd & Wallace Galleries have agreed to split the show and include some other works in the show by various of our gallery artists. Thus, a select group show will be simultaneously exhibited with a selection of Nancy Boyd’s exhibition. So we aim to surprise you with a stunning selection of various artist to compliment the Boyd exhibition. We hope you will join us for the opening!

Nancy Boyd: Bardo: From Tibetan Buddhism: a state of existence between death and rebirth, varying in length according to a person’s conduct in life and manner of, or age at, death.

Metaphorically, “Bardo” can describe times when our usual way of life becomes suspended, as, for example, during a period of illness.

Galleries West Magazine’s Mark Mushet interviewed Nancy Boyd for her exhibition. HERE is the link to the video that is available now.


Artist Information

Nancy Boyd

Price range: $500-$5000

Artist Interview & Statement 2020

Nancy Boyd was interviewed by Dorothy Woodend of the Tyee about her views and the impact of the pandemic on her and her practice. In the article “Staving Off Pandemic Panic, an Artist Turns to Masked Portraits”, Boyd reveals how the pandemic has affected her.

Many artists are contending with the double-edged pandemic sword of unfocused time and existential angst. But the humble act of drawing can offer a way to calm the mind and chart a path forward.

“Drawing isn’t a panacea, but a discipline. For artist Nancy Boyd, it’s also a way of making sense of the world. Boyd, who taught drawing and painting at Capilano University for more than two decades, works from her home studio in East Vancouver. In the early months of the pandemic she turned her hand to drawing masked people. A few were people she knew, but many more were faces from the news, health-care workers and frontline folk, with only their eyes visible. She has drawn more than 50 masked faces so far, representing a broad range of ages and backgrounds. …”

“I wanted to be a witness to this extraordinary time but in a way that wasn’t fraught with all the complex considerations that plagued my regular practice.”

For the full article please go to The Tyee’s website HERE.

Nancy was born in Hamilton in 1949 and studied art at Ontario College of Art as well as at the University of Waterloo before moving to Vancouver. For years she worked as a designer and architectural renderer, most notably for Expo 86. Nancy taught design, drawing and painting at Capilano University for 23 years before she retired in 2010. Her work retains the influences of her design and architectural rendering background as evident in her fascination with ‘views’ and the conflation of scale between the microscopic and the cosmic. All her work, either representational or abstract, is infused with an ongoing sense of wonder and attention to the beautiful.

Nancy has shown extensively in the Lower Mainland and western Canada as well as internationally in the US, Japan and Australia. Her work can be seen at the Vancouver Art Gallery and Burnaby Art Gallery Rental Programs and at Wallace Galleries in Calgary.

Nancy Boyd, a Vancouver artist and educator, has worked in various capacities in the local art scene for many years. Once a designer and illustrator for Expo ‘86, she now teaches drawing and painting part-time at Capilano College in North Vancouver when she is not in her studio. Her mixed media work is increasingly abstract, highly tactile and frequently infused with figurative or metaphoric allusions. She has shown extensively around the lower mainland in the public galleries of Richmond, Surrey, Burnaby and Coquitlam. In addition, her work has been exhibited in Washington State, Japan and locally at Equinox and Diane Farris galleries. In Vancouver, her work is handled exclusively by Elliot Louis Gallery. In Victoria, her work is shown by Fran Willis Gallery and in Calgary by Wallace Galleries.

Solo Exhibitions

2015 More Wabi Sabi: Dark Matter, SOPA Gallery, Kelowna, BC

2014 Wabi Sabi: Dark Matter, SOPA Gallery, Kelowna, BC

2014 Final Capilano Grad and Faculty Show, Gordon Smith Gallery,

North Vancouver, BC

2013 Exploring Abstraction Wallace Galleries, Calgary, Alberta

2012 New Artists Elissa Cristall Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2009 (to 2012) Under 8 SOPA Gallery, Kelowna, BC

2009 Vancouver International Drawing Festival Elliot Louis Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2008 New Work, Atelier Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2006 Against the Cold, Atelier Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2006 New Work (with Andy Petterson), Wallace Gallery, Calgary, Alberta

2004 New Work (with Camrose Ducote), Wallace Gallery, Calgary, Alberta

2004 SCANQUEST, Elliot Louis Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2002 Resonance Imaging, Ballard/Lederer Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2001 Resonance Imaging, Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1999 Portrait Analogs, Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1999 Recent Drawings of Classical Sculpture, Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1999 Portrait Analogs, Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby BC

1999 Portrait Analogs, Evergreen Cultural Centre, Coquitlam BC

1998 Beyond Random, Grand Forks Art Gallery, Grand Forks BC

1997 Geography Duets, Fran Willis Gallery, Victoria BC

1997 Opening, Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1994 Into the Labyrinth, Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1993 Vessels, Richmond Art Gallery, Richmond BC

1992 Vessels, Patrick Doheny Fine Arts, Vancouver BC

1991 New Drawings, Patrick Doheny Fine Arts, Vancouver BC

1990 New Paintings and Drawings, Patrick Doheny Fine Arts, Vancouver BC

1990 Nancy Boyd: 1984-1990, Surrey Art Gallery, Surrey BC

Group Exhibitions

2016 Summer Show, Gallery Artists, SOMA Gallery, Vancouver BC

2013 Exploring Abstraction, Wallace Galleries, Calgary

2012 New Artists, Elissa Cristall Gallery, Vancouver

2009 Under 8, SOPA Gallery, Kelowna, BC

2007 Faculty Exhibit, Capilano College, Vancouver, BC

2007 Splash, (also 2006, 2005) Vancouver, BC

2006 Atelier Gallery, Vancouver, BC

2006 Splash, Vancouver, BC

2006 Faculty Exhibit, Capilano Colleg, Vancouver, BC

2006 Faculty Exchange Exhibit, U. of Wollongong, Australia

2005 Art for Life, Vancouver, BC

2002 Volumes: Sculptural Artist’s Books, Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby BC

1999 Art for Life, Vancouver BC

1998 Art of the Book, Community Arts Council, Vancouver BC

1998 Printmakers, Fran Willis Gallery, Victoria BC

1997 Art for Life, Vancouver BC

1997 Art for Life, Vancouver BC

1997 Ji Ku/Space-Time, Asian Centre, UBC, Vancouver BC

1996 Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1994 Capilano College Art Gallery, North Vancouver BC

1993 Ramsay Gallery, Vancouver BC

1993 Fran Willis Gallery, Victoria BC

1992 Aichi Gekusan College, Japan

1990 Diane Farris Gallery, Vancouver BC

Collections

Air Canada

Boughton, Peterson, Yan, Anderson

Briant, Angus, McClellan and Ruebenstein

City of Vancouver Art Collection

Fireside Industries International

First City Financial Corporation

Hotel Georgia, Vancouver BC

Lignum Ltd.

MacAulay McColl

McDonald’s of Canada

Telesat Canada

St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver

Peterson, Yan, Anderson, Vancouver

The Keg, Toronto

Bibliography

“Five Artists Selling in the West”, Galleries West Magazine, Fall/Winter 2013.

‘‘Artists at Capilano College, The Capilano Review, 2007

‘‘Global Relations’‘, Ilawarra Mercury News, Australia, 2006

‘‘Nancy Boyd at the Evergreen Cultural Centre, Asian Art News, March/April, 1999

Nancy Boyd: Portrait Anaglogs, Johnson, Mia, PREVIEW, November 1998

The Power and the Glory, The Vancouver Sun, November 14, 1992

New Drawings from Nancy Boyd, The Vancouver Sun, June 28, 1991

Works from a Female Perspective, The Vancouver Sun, May 12, 1990

Visual Puns Compelling, The Province, May 11, 1987

Bardo (from Tibetan Buddhism): a state of existence between death and rebirth, varying in length according to a person’s conduct in life and manner of, or age at, death.

Metaphorically, Bardo can describe times when our usual way of life becomes suspended, as, for example, during a period of illness.

“These new mixed-media drawings on mylar were not made about the pandemic but they were certainly created under the influence of the pandemic and so at least subconsciously have been impacted by that condition. This series is a reflection of the liminal state we inhabit, much like a Bardo state, while the struggle between the virus and our shifting place in the natural world rages on.

An existential crisis can generate both dread and, if you’re open to it, an unexpected glimmer of freedom when at the end of a proverbial, or literal, tether. As the pandemic progressed, our sense of time became unmoored. Our social fabric began to unravel. All the usual concerns about my art practice, such as inventory, meaning and productivity, began to take a back seat to other concerns: aging, mortality, the environment, social injustice and certainly the pandemic itself. After grinding to a halt during the first 6 months of the pandemic, my first creative response in the spring of 2020 was to simply observe and record the people who were affected by the virus and its social disruption, by doing fifty realistic pencil drawings of masked faces. This was followed by another fallow period during which I felt more or less creatively paralyzed and couldn’t work. Both reactions, the controlled drawings and the paralysis, were born of fear, sadness and dread. There was a sense of life as we know it coming to a halt.

Then somehow in January 2021, in the face of the relentlessness of the pandemic and the anxiety and uncertainties it created, I sensed that I had little…or everything…to lose. And like everyone else, I found myself in this global liminal state: the in-between of how we used to be versus how we will be in the unknown future. My state of dread, sadness and ennui shifted to a condition of freedom and surrender. I began to work with more unfettered abandon and little regard for the outcome. My work became less predictable, more fluidly adaptable and deeply engaged with all the accidental moments that arose in the creative process, more so than ever before.

As with much of my work in recent years, these pieces continued to address the mutable and the conditional in all things. But in these Bardo Songs, it was as though I had been stunned into being less inhibited. I surrendered to the unknown and to the sense of being suspended in a strange state of contemplation and possibilities, some dark and some full of light. While I never overtly tried to work in imagery that spoke directly about the pandemic, the pieces almost unavoidably allude to strong forces that were clearly on my mind. The pieces reflect that suspended, stressful, dissonant, conflicted, disrupted, in-between, out-of-normal-time/position we have been compelled to inhabit. The dark gestures, the unpredictable fluid media effects and the overwhelmed organic elements are all situated in this time of shifting ground.

I don’t underestimate the tremendous effect COVID has had on the entire world, and certainly on those most deeply affected by the illness it produced, or the social and financial disruption it caused. But I also have an underlying, grudging awe for the way the virus worked its way into the world. It wanted to thrive. It found ways to change itself in order to do that more effectively. As we resisted or reacted, it developed a new strategy or took a new direction. Like the force of the virus, the force behind the black gestures in the paintings carries an awesome and terrible power in the romantic sense of the word; so frightening, it actually touches on the sublime. My process mimics the path required by us as the pandemic progressed. Deep contemplation, adaptability, responsiveness, as well as bursts of intuitive energy have all become indispensable both in the world and in my work. I continue to be open to beauty wherever I can find it, even if that place is a truly strange one, like the Bardo.”

Nancy Boyd (April, 2021)